Interview with Miriam Meri from TinyCutePie

Sweet girls with a nostalgic look are the signature of Miriam Meri, better known as TinyCutePie. She started customizing in 2013 and still does it as a hobby but with so much dedication that this tenderness reaches us through her dolls.



Keep going, even if you are not happy with your results. Practice will give you evolution, and this is something you will see in the end. So never give up and undermine yourself by comparing with other artists.

Miriam Meri / Tinycutepie

DollyCustom posed 12 questions to Miriam Meri about her history as a customizer, her process, and techniques. Here are those questions:

Can you tell me a little about yourself?

I am a custom doll artist from Barcelona. I have always loved arts and crafts and fell in love at first sight with Blythe dolls. With them, I was able to develop so many skills in so many levels that I only have gratitude towards this hobby.

When and how did you discover Blythe dolls?

At that time I was living in Kyoto as an exchange student. It was in 2012, right after the Fukushima incident. One afternoon I was shopping in Teramachi street when a doll in a store window caught my attention. It was a Meowsy Wowsy. It was love at first sight, so I worked so hard to be able to buy it.

How long did it take for your style to emerge?

I may say ages. I had no idea of carving when I started, so it took a lot of time until I found what I was looking. I may say buying a Dremel showed a vast range of carving possibilities.

Do you do this as a hobby or professionally?

I have always considered it as a hobby.

What is your creative process like? Do you plan your custom dolls from start to finish or just go with the flow?

I am always trying to reproduce realistic features, so my main idea is to achieve a realistic look with carving. However, I always say that in the end, it is the doll that chooses how it wants to look like.

What is your favorite part of this process and your least favorite?

My favorite part is carving the mouth and do the makeup. My least favorite part is sanding and sealing the faceplates, hehe.

I love to work with RBL Blythes.

How long does it take you to customize one doll? Do you do one at a time or multiple?

It usually depends on my mood and my inspiration. If my mood and motivation are high, I can work on several dolls at the same time and finish them within 1 or 2 weeks. But this is rarely happening, so I like to be working in batches of time so that I can disconnect and reconnect with the creation process.

Where do you work on your dolls? Do you have a dedicated workplace?

I work in my bedroom, right in front of my computer so I can watch or listen to TV programs while I am carving.

How would you characterize your style?

I would say it’s realistic.

What are your favorite tools? What is your favorite Blythe mold to customize?

The Dremel saved my life. It has allowed me to create shapes that would have been impossible to achieve with just an x-acto knife.

How did you develop the pricing model for your dolls?

I set the price based on materials and time spent, and obviously how happy I am with the results.

For the beginner customizer, what advice would you give them?

Keep going, even if you are not happy with your results. Practice will give you evolution, and this is something you will see in the end. So never give up and undermine yourself by comparing to other artists. Each of us has a different curve of learning 😊.


Miriam started her hobby as a Blythe doll customizer after discovering Blythe dolls in a student exchange in Japan. Her dolls are sweet little girls that invite us to their nostalgic world with a tender look.

Keep up with Miriam’s work by following on Instagram or her other social media – check her profile page for more information.



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